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Transformer

Netzteil-√úbertrager

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RJ45 Transformer

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Transformer Module

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Transformer

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Halo

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10/100BASE-TX ISOLATION MODULE

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10/100BASE-TX ISOLATION MODULE

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1-PORT GIGABIT OR 2-PORT ETH

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SINGLE GIGABIT ETH. MAGNETICS

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Transformer

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Transformer

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6-PIN SMT POWER TRANSFORMER

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8Pin SMD Power Transformer/4.5KV/reinforced

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8Pin SMD Power Transformer/4.5KV/reinforced

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REINFORCED ISOLATION TRANSFORMER/4KVr

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6-PIN SMD POWER TRANSFORMER

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A transformer is an essential electrical device that is used to transfer electrical energy between two or more circuits through electromagnetic induction. It operates on the principle that a changing magnetic field induces a voltage in a nearby coil of wire. Transformers are commonly used for changing voltage levels in electrical circuits and are found in various applications. Here's an overview of transformers:
  1. Basic Function: A transformer consists of two coils of wire, known as the primary and secondary windings, wound around a shared magnetic core. When an alternating current (AC) flows through the primary winding, it generates a changing magnetic field in the core, which in turn induces a voltage in the secondary winding.
  2. Turns Ratio: The ratio of the number of turns in the primary winding to the number of turns in the secondary winding is called the turns ratio. It determines the voltage transformation between the primary and secondary sides.
  3. Step-Up and Step-Down: Transformers can step up (increase) or step down (decrease) the voltage levels. A step-up transformer has more turns in the secondary winding, resulting in a higher output voltage, while a step-down transformer has fewer turns, resulting in a lower output voltage.
  4. Conservation of Energy: In an ideal transformer, energy is conserved; that is, the power input on the primary side is equal to the power output on the secondary side, neglecting losses.
  5. Applications: Transformers are used in power distribution systems to change voltage levels for long-distance transmission and for providing different voltage levels to households and businesses. They are also used in electronic devices, such as power adapters, and in industrial applications for controlling voltage and current.
  6. Isolation and Safety: Transformers provide electrical isolation between primary and secondary windings, which helps protect against electrical shocks and provides galvanic isolation between two circuits.
  7. Efficiency and Losses: While transformers are efficient devices, they do have losses due to factors like resistance in the windings and hysteresis in the core material. This is why transformers can get warm during operation.
  8. Auto-Transformers: Auto-transformers have a single winding that serves as both the primary and secondary winding. They can step up or step down the voltage, but they lack complete electrical isolation between the input and output.
  9. Ferrite and Iron Cores: Transformers can use different types of cores, such as ferrite and iron, depending on the application. Each core material has its own magnetic properties, affecting efficiency and performance.
  10. Impedance Matching: Transformers can also be used for impedance matching, ensuring efficient transfer of power between different parts of a circuit.
In summary, a transformer is a fundamental device that transfers electrical energy between circuits by electromagnetic induction. Its ability to change voltage levels and provide electrical isolation makes it indispensable in power distribution, electronics, and various industries.